Is there a standard practice for attributing CC licensed content?

I want to thank Kevin Gamble in his post about Public media and copyright for holding our feet to the fire on this issue. I actually posed a question about this in one of the sessions at IMA2007 (or maybe it was over dinner)… in particular, we post all our audio using a creative commons license.

My question was this, how do we make it easy for people to talk about our work, to cite it, to “copy it” to display it. Is it through an embedded flash player that we can make it easy to include the appropriate attribution information, the station’s call letters/url, the author’s name, the link back to the story. If there is a standard practice out there, please let me know about it.

For instance, I got an email from The Herberger College of Fine Arts at Arizona State University, they wanted to use an interview that we did with one of their professors, Jazz Studies director Mike Kocour. I babbled on in technicaleese about attribution etc and they simply said, “just give us the audio.” For all the slickness and polish of ASU’s site, when they finally post the audio that they said they just wanted, what will the presentation be like? Will this be accurately and equitably presented?

How do we as public broadcasters have this conversation? If we start with how to protect the rights of our own content, then maybe it will be easier for us to think about extending similar protections to user generated content.

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  • I’m not sure if it would answer your specific question, but a recent thread on Ask MetaFilter addressed this question in relation to photos.

  • Randy

    all I want to do is post a stupid picture of someone without fearing a lawsuit. right now I just do it anyway.

  • admin

    I hear you Randy. There has to be an extensive, easier (and cost effective) way to obtain artist photos — for use in promoting the artist and their work — while still respecting the rights of the photographer. Something like GettyImages for the Arts.